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Stretching Your Scrap

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Do you ever feel bad about those teeny cane ends and little piles of scrap clay? I hope not; because those “scraps” are the most fun parts of caning and claying. Leftovers can be stretched to cover quite a bit of ground, or in this case, wooden beads. We will use cane ends along with the rough scrap that resulted from making the original canes. Design by Teresa Pandora Salgado
2-3 ounces (or more) of cane ends and coordinated mixed scrap clay, Wooden beads-your choice of shapes, sizes and quantity, Elastic cord-I use 4.7mm by Sew-ology, 1 lobster clasp and 1 head pin (for optional cabochon), Acrylic block or slab for flattening (I use the Lentil Bead Tool from my Sculpey Bead Making Kit), Small pieces of heavy paper or light plastic for templates, Scissors, Craft Knife, Wire Cutter,|2-3 ounces (or more) of cane ends and coordinated mixed scrap clay, Wooden beads-your choice of shapes, sizes and quantity, Elastic cord-I use 4.7mm by Sew-ology, 1 lobster clasp and 1 head pin (for optional cabochon), Acrylic block or slab for flattening (I use the Lentil Bead Tool from my Sculpey Bead Making Kit), Small pieces of heavy paper or light plastic for templates, Scissors, Craft Knife, Wire Cutter,

Project Instructions

Select a few canes that are at least 2 inches long. Most of these will be reduced from your previous project. If you have some canes you want to use and they’re too big, be sure to reduce them to coordinate with the scale of the other canes.
Form a triangle. This whole project was made with just the 1 ½” x 2” cane shown here and the rough scrap from the component canes.
Slice 12 thin pieces from the cane and make two kaleidoscopes
Select a pretty area to use for your cabochon. Make a scrap cabochon core and cover with the kaleidoscopes. Trim with a craft knife.
Insert a head or eye pin into a lobster claw clasp. Cut off the head and bend a little hook in one side of the pin. Push the pin into the top of the cabochon and smooth edges.
Make a sheet of scrap clay on the #7 setting of your Sculpey Clay Conditioning Machine. (You’ll notice my scrap sheet is that not-so-charming maroon we all end up with.) Cut some thin triangles from your remaining cane and lay them out on the scrap sheet. If you like, make a template the size of your wooden bead. Cut out as many strips as you can. Cover the bigger beads with the strips and smooth them.
This is SO fun. Compress the rough scrap with a flat object. You can use an acrylic block or even a piece of wood. I like to use my Lentil Bead Tool because it’s just the right size.
Slice a couple times, stack in the same direction and form a rectangle about the size of your smaller beads. Wrap and smooth as you did with the larger beads.
Create your necklace design based on how many large and small beads you ended up with. No stress, right? String them on the elastic cord and use your remaining wooden beads, or any beads you have on hand, to finish your necklace in the desired length. Tie with a surgeon’s knot and tuck it inside the top bead.
Wasn’t that fun? Wooden beads come in all shapes, sizes and colors; and the holes are perfect for elastic, so you don’t need jewelry tools. Try this with all your pretty scraps.
Select a few canes that are at least 2 inches long. Most of these will be reduced from your previous project. If you have some canes you want to use and they’re too big, be sure to reduce them to coordinate with the scale of the other canes.
Form a triangle. This whole project was made with just the 1 ½” x 2” cane shown here and the rough scrap from the component canes.
Slice 12 thin pieces from the cane and make two kaleidoscopes
Select a pretty area to use for your cabochon. Make a scrap cabochon core and cover with the kaleidoscopes. Trim with a craft knife.
Insert a head or eye pin into a lobster claw clasp. Cut off the head and bend a little hook in one side of the pin. Push the pin into the top of the cabochon and smooth edges.
Make a sheet of scrap clay on the #7 setting of your Sculpey Clay Conditioning Machine. (You’ll notice my scrap sheet is that not-so-charming maroon we all end up with.) Cut some thin triangles from your remaining cane and lay them out on the scrap sheet. If you like, make a template the size of your wooden bead. Cut out as many strips as you can. Cover the bigger beads with the strips and smooth them.
This is SO fun. Compress the rough scrap with a flat object. You can use an acrylic block or even a piece of wood. I like to use my Lentil Bead Tool because it’s just the right size.
Slice a couple times, stack in the same direction and form a rectangle about the size of your smaller beads. Wrap and smooth as you did with the larger beads.
Create your necklace design based on how many large and small beads you ended up with. No stress, right? String them on the elastic cord and use your remaining wooden beads, or any beads you have on hand, to finish your necklace in the desired length. Tie with a surgeon’s knot and tuck it inside the top bead.
Wasn’t that fun? Wooden beads come in all shapes, sizes and colors; and the holes are perfect for elastic, so you don’t need jewelry tools. Try this with all your pretty scraps.